Powers of Manuka Honey

Manuka honey is a type of honey that comes from New Zealand and Southeastern Australia. The bees gather nectar and pollen from the flowers of the Manuka tree, hence where the honey got its name. As many of us know, honey is known for its antibacterial properties; however, this specific honey has even stronger benefits.

Some studies show that Manuka honey contains methyglyoxal, which lends the honey its antibacterial properties. This agent is not effected by heat, light or any substance bin the human body, giving this type of honey a special power. It has also been assumed that the honey has an osmotic effect, drawing moisture from the environment and dehydrating bacteria (Kasprowicz, 2015). Likewise, it has an acidic natural which inhibits the growth of microorganisms.

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So what is this honey used for?

Healing minor cuts and burns

Honey has the ability to absorb moisture from wounds, sucking the impurities and protecting the body against infection. It also prevents bacteria from growing on the wound.

Soothing coughs and symptoms of the common cold

Due to the honeys anti-bacterial properties, adding a spoon full of Manuka honey to a cup of tea can improve common cold symptoms or a cough. It has been shown to be more effective than regular honey. A study reported that when the colonies of strep throat were treated with Manuka honey, the bacteria count fell by up to 85 percent, while other studies have reported that it can help inhibit staph, pneumonia, and salmonella (Battis, 2014).

Digestion

Manuka honey has been shown to reduce bloating, digestive upsets, indigestion and gastric reflux. It has also been helpful for people with IBS. You can add Manuka honey to your diet in many ways, like adding it to your yogurt or spreading it on toast.

Beauty

Other than Manuka honey boosting energy and making you feel good during the day, but its nutrient-dense nature can help improve skin tone and texture. It has anti-inflammatory properties to calm redness or other skin issues. You can make an exfoliating face wash, to improve your complexion by decreasing the bacteria, or make a hair mask to enhance the natural shine of your hair.

Face wash recipe:
1/3 cup castile soap
1/3 cup Manuka honey
3 tbsp distilled water
2 tbsp jojoba oil

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References

Kasprowicz, S., M.D., & Siegel, Daniel Mark,M.D., M.S. (2015). A honey of a healing agent. Dermatology Times, 36(10), 14. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.montclair.edu:2048/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.montclair.edu/docview/1805206909?accountid=12536
Tweed, V. (2016). Super honey. Better Nutrition, 78(9), 26-26,28. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.montclair.edu:2048/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.montclair.edu/docview/1820269732?accountid=12536
Battis, L. (2014, 11). Don’t get sick this season. Men’s Health, 29, 111-112, 114, 116. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.montclair.edu:2048/login?url=https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.montclair.edu/docview/1679938631?accountid=12536
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Aloe Vera – Why do we need it?

Aloe Vera comes from the Liliaceal family, where there are about 360 species. It is a cactus-like plant with yellow flowers that grows in hot, dry climates. It originated in Africa, and is now grown in warm climates around the world, like Asia, Europe and America. It is used in cosmetics, as well as for its medicinal properties. These products are made from the mucilaginous tissue in the center of the aloe vera leaf. The center of the leaf is bitter, yellow and commonly known as the sap, or juice of the aloe vera plant.

The medicinal uses of Aloe Vera include anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity, as well as, antibacterial and hypogylcaemic effects (Vogler, 1999). It contains many active elements, including, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, sugars, lignin, saponins, salicylic acids and amino acids. The gel contains vitamins like, Vitamin A, C, and E, as well as Vitamin B1, niacin, B2, choline and folic acid (Nazir, 2017). The gel is used in the preparation of health drinks, and food products, like milk and ice cream. It is also used as a flavoring component or a preservative for various foods.

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Due to the plants high nutrient content, it has been shown to be very beneficial for the body. Here are a few of some of the valuable properties:

Arthritis:

Aloe Vera has been shown to repair arthritis-damaged tissue, since it contains analgesic, an anti-inflammatory agent (Nazir, 2017). It can be taken orally applied externally to help repair the damaged tissue and detoxify the area.  Likewise, it can help reduce pain associated with arthritis and swelling.

Heals Wounds:

Since Aloe Vera has many anti-bacterial properties, it has been shown to heal wounds. It has been used to dress wounds for centuries, reducing burns, restoring skin and pain. Research has shown that the juice seals the wounds while drawing blood to the wound, improving the healing properties.

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Immune System:

Aloe Vera has natural detoxifying properties that can cleanse the digestive system and circulatory system. This can help improve the absorption of nutrients and consequently improve the immune system. It has also been shown to inhibit free radicals.

Anti-aging:

Some properties in Aloe Vera helps bind moisture into the skin. Aloe stimulates fibroblast, which produces the collagen and elastin fibers making the skin more elastic, reducing wrinkles (Surjushe, 2008). It helps the skin stay moisturized for longer periods of time, while hardening skin cells and tightening pores. It has also been shown to have an anti-acne effect on the skin, due to the antibacterial properties.

 

 

References

Nazir, A. (2017). Health benefits of aloe vera: A wonder plant. International Journal of Chemical Studies. doi:10.7717/peerj.2589/fig-3
VOGLER, B. K. (october 1999). Aloe vera: A systematic review of its clinical effectiveness. British Journal of General Practice,. Retrieved from http://bjgp.org/content/bjgp/49/447/823.full.pdf
Surjushe, A., Vasani, R., & Saple, D. (2008). Aloe vera: A short review. Indian Journal of Dermatology, 53(4), 163. doi:10.4103/0019-5154.44785